Meet the McCourts

Please introduce yourself and your family to us, and also tell us what country and/or state you are from.

Hello, we are the McCourts: mom and dad; Danika, 8 (third grade); and Eric, 5 (kindergartener) — from Northern California. 

How long have you been home schooling?

I started homeschooling in November of 2016. Danikawas in a private Adventist school prior. So, I have been homeschooling for a little over a year but have learned a lot in that time.

Why did you decide to home school?

Lots of our friends homeschool, but I never ever thought I’d do that. My husband attended homeschool gettogether at church while I was working, where they read about the imprinting parents do to their kids, especially in early years. We started talking about it. My husband told me he would teach…he had good intentions, but now I’m the teacher 95% of the time. The factors that tipped me over in favor of homeschooling were mundane (I never considered myself capable of homeschooling): I got tired of driving to school each day, lost about two hours in a day in driving. Also, cost would have been significant after my second kid joined. So, I decided to try the first year to see whether I could manage one kid. Now I’m managing two, and kindergarten is 1:1 most of the time.

What style of home schooling does your family follow?

As a firsttime homeschooler, I needed structure. I’m foreign born so I had no idea about what a USA curriculum consisted of. We ordered a box curriculum the first year, using the nonSDA Sonlight program. Quickly I realized what works for us, what we like and don’t like. This year we are doing mixandmatch curriculum. I spent a lot of hours researching different subjects, talking to homeschool moms on different forums until I built my own opinion of what would work for us and what we wanted. I don’t always follow recommendations by others. Some recommendations persuade me to try something else. Another plus in California is that we are doing independent study through a charter school. We have to cover state minimums, and we do tests two times a year in math and reading; in return the state provides funds for classes in art, PE, music, etc. Some people may consider that a restriction, but actually so far we have done well, and although tests may be inaccurate and bothersome, eventually in life everyone needs to take some tests so its not that annoying to me. Currently the benefits outweigh the negative, which may change eventually. Im not required to use any specific curriculum.

Do you have a philosophy about home schooling?

No. I don’t have any particular philosophy, but my thinking is that we put God first, then we try to know and do the best we can in everything. Daniel is my inspiration. I always tell my kids that when enemies tried to investigate Daniel, they found nothing they could complain about except his worship. He must have been an excellent student in that Babylonian university. I grew up in a communist country, so structure, discipline, and schedule are important to me. Homeschooling is very flexible, but not having goals to achieve, etc. — its not my philosophy. “Unschooled”: I still don’t get that term. 

What kinds of tools, resources, or curriculums do you use to home school, and why?

For my third-grader I use nonSDA Sonlight world history (we started two-year cycle so we continue the spine only this year). We do our own additions, YouTube videos, love Lineage Journey and Truth Unshackled (thank you, ladies, for posting about those). For language arts we use Fix it Grammar, Spelling Phoneric zoo (love it that is independent work CD with earphone), started slowly IEW composition writing. We use also intermittently workbooks as Wordlywise, Word roots. For geography we color continents and countries. We use Sonlight science (my daughter’s favorite part), but next year we will choose random books as our interests progress; so far my daughter has become an animal expert, and I’m way behind because she does a lot of independent reading. We do Singapore mathlike it a lot. We used Reason for Handwriting for her for cursive last year (as her school used that), but this year I just make her do her grammar copy work in cursive as we have no time to do handwriting. She took art and piano last year; she takes piano, sewing, and gymnastics this year (we use that for P.E.; my daughter is not a gymnast type, lol). For the little guy we are focusing on basics only this year. Language arts we do Logic of English, cursive first. He started from not being able to hold his pen in August, to writing cursive capital letters recently. He also started reading. We have been learning phonograms together, rules, etc. I guess there is logic in English (although sometimes I still wonder, lol). He uses Singapore math too, which is very colorful and happy at his level. If he wants to participate in anything else, he can learn with sister; otherwise, he is playing legos as his learning time is way shorter than sister’s is. We do sanctuary study and etiquette studies (we have been slacking on those recently).

Are you the primary “teacher,” or do your spouse or other family members participate with home schooling?

I’m the primary teacher, although the intention originally was for Dad to teach as he is American born and we both work as registered nurses, but it didn’t work out that way. Maybe God worked it that way, because I would have never agreed to homeschool but now I’m doing it. It has been great character building opportunity…my patience has grown, but it needs way more for the “patience of the saints.” (I need to get Dad to participate more.) Occasionally, I will assign something for dad and son to do together, and I go grocery shopping alone. My husband is the person that teaches our kids to bike, ski, swim, motorcycle, etc., from a very early age, so where I’m timid, my husband is not. I just close my eyes and say a prayer – lol.

What does a typical home schooling day look like in your home?

Typical school day: We start together with prayer and studying our Sabbath School lessons. Then I have a board on which I assign for my daughter from four to eight things to do in a particular day. Usual day is maybe something like this: 1: grammar, 2. spelling, 3. piano, 4. color countries in West Africa, 5. math, and 6. read science assignment. Usually 80% or more she can do independently, and I check her work later and correct if needed. While she does independent work, I do school with little guy. We start with violin first; then Logic of English which involves writing and reading, but very playful with lots of games; then we do some math. Once I’m done with him, I can read history or other advanced readings that my daughter is interested in. We may watch a video or do some spiritual insights on history as often they are lacking. Both kids go once a week to music lessons (one violin, the other piano; I’m completely musically illiterate so I struggle in that area), they both take gymnastics for exercise, and my older one takes sewing. In the afternoon I try to get them outside on our property (there is always something to do) if Im not working that day (I work 2:45-11:15pm).

What do you love the most about home schooling, and what do you dislike the most?

The most I like about homeschooling: no daily driving, and the ability to move faster or sloweras needed. We can do work when we are home, and we can go somewhere when people are in school. Its not unusual for us to homeshool during Christmas break and be not in school at random times if needed to travel, etc.

Negatives? I worried a lot about my daughter’s social life as she was a school lover and pulling her out of school was very dramatic for her, but as time went by, with events at church, Adventurers club, meeting kids at classes, it hasn’t become the problem I envisioned. Having opportunity to take more classes than we can because of school funding has kept us very busy. Amazingly,she and her brother bonded on a level they have never been when she went to school. They are best friends, which makes me happy.

Is there anything you would like to share about your home school?

So far I love homeschool and never thought I would. Two year ago if someone told me I’ll homeschool, I would have said,No way!” I still am taking a year at a time and may want to put my kids back in private school in high school, or maybe I’ll change my mind by then. I am hoping Jesus will return by then so I don’t need to decide.

 

Homeschooling with the Gallaghers

Please introduce yourself and your family to us, and also tell us what country and/or state you are from.

Hello, I’m Nikki, wife to a career US Air Force man, and mom to five children, ages 13 to 2, four boys and one girl. We have lived in five states in 15 years, but currently reside in Northern Virginia. I’m a Michigan girl and my husband was raised in New Jersey, so we enjoy the seasons and colder weather. I was an aerospace engineer and did not have plans to stay home as a mom, and certainly not to homeschool.  

How long have you been home schooling?

We’ve only homeschooled! So, if age 5 is the starting point, then we are in our eighth year. 

Why did you decide to home school?

Originally, we wanted to provide an environment that agreed with our limited worldly influence philosophy,which we felt was lacking in other schools. We also wanted to make sure Christ was the center of all that our son learned. After we started, we quickly realized the many benefits outside of a protection mentality. It definitely wasn’t because it was easier.

What style of home schooling does your family follow?

We started out less academic and heavily influenced through nature and Bible. After our son was in the third grade, and didn’t know who Abraham Lincoln was, it changed my perspective. We are more traditional now, in the sense of how we have a school room, each child a desk and schedule. We do utilize the library.

Do you have a philosophy about home schooling?

After years of schooling, my philosophy is each family has to discover what works for their family. We not only have an obligation to raise our children in the Lord, and provide a True Education, but we need to help our children be capable of conversing with the world and neighbors. Structure provides an environment for character building, and flexibility provides the opportunity for creative and broader learning. I like to combine all of the above! 

What kinds of tools, resources, or curriculums do you use to home school, and why?

We are very eclectic I don’t stick with one curriculum for all subjects. As a familywe have decided to only allow the viewing and reading of that which is true, so that has limited our curriculum selection. We use Apologia science, Abeka history (a strong Christian perspective), Math-U-See, and Christian Light Publications for language arts. For our first two children, I used Riggs curriculum for nearly two years, and we were not successful. So, I taught them both to read better using Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons. I certainly needed easy at this point! With our third and fourth children, we used the Christian Light Publication’s Learning To Read program. I think it is fantastic and works well with our family. Our third son needs more math, so he uses MathUSee and Christian Light Publications mathematics. I am finally starting to see some fruit with using both. Since our oldest is considered junior high, the curriculum began to change in difficulty. We had him in the Apologia general science course, but since his siblings are in a different science, my attention was split. It is a difficult curriculum to be independent with. I switched him to Rod and Staff science, and, although drier, it is less intense and less demanding, so it is working better for us. We are entering the upper level school and having to find different curriculum. I am looking forward to attending a homeschool convention for the first time this spring. I need more resources and help as we navigate our oldest through!

A few years ago, we switched our character curriculum to be more gender specific. At the time, I had three young boys (they are still young, really) ages 8, 6, and 4.  I wanted to shepherd their hearts to be thinking more like a man. Having them with me all the time, I wanted to be sure to discuss issues not within my spiritual sphere, but what should be in theirs. So, we started using Plants Grown Up, by Doorposts. I love how it teaches us to raise them to be godly MEN. I added Polished Cornerstones this year for my 6yearold daughter, and what a huge blessing it has been! This is my favorite time in school. We also added this year a book called For This Is Right, by Doorposts, which is a practical application and study of the fifth commandment (honoring parents).

Are you the primary “teacher,” or does your spouse or other family members participate with home schooling?

I am the primary teacher. Dad does help grade and explain when he can, but he travels out of state on a regular basis. He is out of town this week! He has a Ph.D. in applied physics, so he can’t wait to facilitate some upper level science.

What does a typical home schooling day look like in your home?

We rise between 6 a.m. and 7 a.m., depending on child, have personal devotions, then get ready for the day. Family worship is next, then into breakfast. We have cleanup and chores, and right now we are starting at 9:30 a.m. I would like that to be earlier. This year, we all start on the same subject and move through the day. We have done different scheduling routines, but this helps me. I can think math the entire time and help each grade level, four grades! We take a short recess, then back to school. As the kids are still working in the afternoon, I start our second meal. Some children will begin music practice while dinner is being made. We eat our afternoon meal between 2 and 3 p.m. We clean up, more chores, and then enter into projects;then finish school for our oldest or have free time for those that have worked on schedule. Daddy typically doesn’t get home until 7 p.m.

We open our school with three songs (sometimes hymns) from a folder of old songs I have gathered (most are copied from an old cherished Adventist book called Happy Songs for Boys and Girls). We then start our short study in For This is Right every question is answered from the Bible concerning the fifth commandment. We then begin our academic studies. Later in the afternoon, as our last subject, I take turns with each child going over their character lesson or activity. This weekmy daughter is learning about being a loyal friend.  She wrote a friend a letter, thanking her for friendship.

What do you love the most about home schooling, and what do you dislike the most?

I might be the odd one out, but I’m still learning to enjoy homeschooling. I love being able to influence what my children learn, and direct them to right thinking. I love to know what they are learning and what they have learned.  I love to guard their hearts from the evils of the world and the tendency for most youth to be exposed to concepts that rob their innocence. I love to see my children grow in their reading ability and their love for each subject. I dislike having to feel like I choose between chores and duties of the home and being the perfect homeschool teacher. It is difficult to give attention to my toddler when I have hours of schooling to provide to my older kiddos.Sometimes I feel like I am robbed of some “Mom” time, just being able to enjoy the children without the difficulties we often have.  But, then I’m remindedmy time with them would be even less if they were in a traditional school setting. I try to “turn off” Teacher Mom after school, but it can be a challenge, especially when they really need more study time, or I need to grade their work.

Is there anything you would like to share about your home school?

I enjoy making a welcoming space for our children to have school. I like to make sure they know there are expectations and that they need to always do their best. Sometimes I fail to always give them my best and my full attention as I handle the rest of our needs. I see the fruit of our decisions, especially in how my children treat others and their peers. There is a marked difference, and that makes me very happy and Jesus happy, too. We enjoy gathering with other Seventh-day Adventist homeschoolers, and when we can, we do. I think we just might homeschool through high school. I might have a head full of white hair by then, but it will have been worth it.

 

Homeschooling in Botswana

Please introduce yourself and your family to us, and also tell us what country and/or state you are from.

My name is Lynn Jones. I am married to Steve, have a stepdaughter, Daniella, who is 22 years old and stays with us. I have a son, Jacques, from a previous marriage; he is 21 years old, and also stays with us. The youngest is Patrick; he is 12 years old and he is the one homeschooling. We all stay together with my mum on the same property.

We live in a town called Maun in Botswana. It is a very busy tourist destination on the edge of the Okavango Delta, which attracts a lot of visitors, with plenty wildlifethe ideal place to raise children.

Steve works in a camp called Jao Concession.He is away from home for six weeks, then comes home for two weeks. It was difficult at first, but now I am used to it. I work full day in town as a bookkeeper/accounts. We also run an NGO called Feed a Child Botswana, where we feed over 100 children a day on a weekly basis, as well as some elderly people who can’t care for themselves.

Sunrise over the Thamalakane River in Maun

How long have you been home schooling?

We have only just started homeschool, so it is all new to us with quite a bit of challenges, but we are getting there.

Why did you decide to home school?

We don’t have much choice where it comes to schools: two international schools, one private school, and the rest are government schools where most of the local children go.

The standard of education has dropped considerably over the last two years. Patrick is a year away from high school, and we would have to send him away to boarding school, which we do not want to do as we would only see him twice a year.

We decided to have a go at homeschooling and see how it goes.

Aerial view of the Okavango Delta from the air: you can only get to the camps by plane.

What style of home schooling does your family follow?

We believe that it should be a structured syllabus. 

Do you have a philosophy about home schooling?

We have no philosophy but we believe in oneonone learning, as Patrick seemed to get behind at normal school and no one cared if he understood the work or not.

What kinds of tools, resources, or curriculums do you use to home school, and why?

We chose Wolsey Hall Oxford. It is a British syllabus, with text books and loads of online tutoring and help. As we don’t have museums and other places to visit besides the Okavango Delta, where we go for little breaks, I have to rely on the internet so he can see what is out there in the wide world,and broaden his knowledge on what’s out there. We also watch a lot of Animal Planet and National Geographic programmes, or any other educational programmes that come up on the tv.

When Patrick completes his KS3 course in two years time, he will then move on to the IGSE course, also through Wolsey Hall, which is recognised by many universities in South Africa and Botswana, should he choose to study further.

Patrick and me

Are you the primary “teacher,” or does your spouse or other family members participate with home schooling?

As my husband works away from home and I have a full time job, we have two ladies (tutors) who come to the house Monday to Thursday to help Patrick with his school work, and on a Sunday I help Patrick complete his assignments which are due every week. He has five subjects, and every week one subject is due as an assignment and gets marked by Wolsey Hall tutors, and the results get sent back to us.

What does a typical home schooling day look like in your home?

Patrick gets up at 7 a.m., has breakfast, and starts preparing for his lessons which start at 8 a.m. He first reads a Bible story and prays before he starts. He has sections of 30 to 40 minutes at a time with a 5to 10minute break in between. He spends about two hours on one subject, then moves on to another subject until 1 p.m. 

He does English, geography, and history with one tutor on Monday and Wednesday, and math and science with the other tutor on Tuesday and Wednesday. Friday is usually a day off on condition that he has completed the work schedule for the week. In the afternoon he has an hour of homeworkwhere he answers questions on the relevant work he did that morning, with additional written math homework. 

The rest of the afternoon he usually plays with his friends until I get home at 5 p.m.We have dinner and revise the homework together, then get ready for bed, which is around 8 pm.

On Sunday morning he goes horse riding with his friends, and in the afternoon we sit down together and work through his assignment that’s due for the week. We usually have to hand them in on Tuesday.

Aerial view of the Okavango Delta

What do you love the most about home schooling, and what do you dislike the most?

It is still early days for us as we only started on 9 January 2017. I am spending more time with Patrick in the evenings when we go through the homework for that day. I feel safer that he is at home and that he has the oneonone tutoring available to him now, and that he doesn’t get left behind if he is not understanding a topic. When Patrick went to normal school, I didn’t seem to spend as much time with him as I do now. It is bringing us closer to each other as we continue our new journey.

I am also pleased that my mum can spend more time with Patrick in the afternoons with a bit of Bible study, as he wants to be baptised. We were never able to do this as normal school came out late in the afternoon, and he was always exhausted when he got home. So, homeschooling has changed that for usto be able to spend more time studying the Bible too, not only going to church.

Is there anything you would like to share about your home school?

It is a more advanced curriculum than what is practiced here in Botswana government and private school, but we believe that Patrick will benefit more from it, and hopefully one day he will thank us for making this change for him.

Sunset over the Thamalakane River

Meet Tonya and her Family

Please introduce yourself and your family to us, and also tell us what country and/or state you are from.

My name is Tonya Dietrich, and my children are Shelby (daughter, 12 years old), and Sidney (son, 10 years old).  Shelby is in sixth grade and Sidney is in fourth grade. I am a single mom that works full-time from home, and we live in Oregon, USA. We have a cat, a Bernese mountain dog, and a beta fish.

How long have you been home schooling?

I have only been homeschooling my children since November 28, 2016. Previously they attended a Seventh-day Adventist junior academy since preschool.

Why did you decide to home school?

Both my children had experienced some bullying activity at their old school, and in early November 2016, my daughter was playing on her own on the playground, and two boys with a jump rope ran up to her, called her names, and began running around her wrapping the rope around her waist. She told them to leave her alone, but they did not listen. The kids were not allowed to scream on the playground, and the teacher on duty was a ways away from her and not looking; so, since the boys wouldn’t let her go, she punched the closest boy in the forehead to get away. She was expelled from school for punching, which I agreed with, but the boys — who later bragged to another student at the school that the reason one was punched by Shelby was that they were planning to tie her to a fence post — did not receive any punishment other than to write an “I’m sorry” letter to Shelby.  Neither letter held any empathy and seemed forced. When the school refused to listen to my daughter (and that this wasn’t the first time; a similar situation had happened where the victim was punished, but not the bullies), then I knew another alternative had to happen. Thus, we started homeschooling.

What style of home schooling does your family follow?

I’m not sure what this means as I’m so new to the whole homeschooling thing, but my children are enrolled in a public online school that has a lot of structure and a required one-hour online class every weekday. 

Do you have a philosophy about home schooling?

As long as my kids are learning and I can see their progress, then I’m happy and so are they.

What kinds of tools, resources, or curriculums do you use to home school, and why?

My children are enrolled in Oregon Virtual Academy, which is a public online school affiliated with K12. They have their curriculum specified, and send laptops and printers to each student, all the various books, parent guides, science project materials, etc., for free. At this point being so new to this situation, this was recommended by two friends of mine, and through lots of prayer we enrolled. The low cost was a huge factor, and the fact that I didn’t have to spend a lot of time figuring out curriculum and actually teaching was a must since I work full-time at home and am a single parent. I’m not always thrilled with the local public schools here, but this school so far has proven very good, and my children have two great teachers that work with them and myself. My children also participate in our local Pathfinder group, so I feel that between church and Pathfinders we are getting some Biblical teaching in too.

Are you the primary “teacher,” or does your spouse or other family members participate with home schooling?

My children actually have school teachers that they can contact with questions, etc., and I’m considered their “learning coach.” My daughter doesn’t really need much assistance as she is in sixth grade and is pretty good at managing her time. My son needs more time and instruction/help, but still it is less than me trying to be sole teacher. I’m the only one that helps with the schooling because the relationship with the children’s father is not amicable at all, and moving books, equipment, etc. between houses is not practical.

What does a typical home schooling day look like in your home?

Frequently both kids are starting school about 8:30 a.m., working on various assignments in their daily plan, and then they have a live class for an hour starting at 9:30 a.m. The kids then take a break and do some PE, either kicking or punching our Wave master kicking bag, shoveling snow (we had a lot last December/early January), or other activities. After a break, they go back and work on classes, and I will periodically check in with them to see if there are any questions, etc. My son will come into my home office and ask questions or request some time to study with him, and I can flex my work in order to help him get his studies done. They generally work on school work approximately five hours a day, with PE breaks in between, or walking the dog with me. This may seem a long time for the kids to work on projects, but they do take frequent breaks, and I check in on them frequently as well. It is a system that helps me also get my work done too.

What do you love the most about home schooling, and what do you dislike the most?

So far we all seem to love it. The flexible schedule has been so helpful, and we even take homework with us when we go to doctor appointments, etc., so that we are getting things accomplished even away from the computers. The kids said that being able to go to the bathroom whenever they wanted/needed was a big improvement, since their classrooms previously didn’t always allow bathroom breaks when there were things to be covered for the whole class. My kids are no longer bullied and they are happier. They do not have evening homework that would last all evening until bedtime. Instead we all can cook meals together and get house chores done and then read together before bed.  

I find it harder to schedule appointments for doctor visits, etc., because of the live class that they need to attend.  But, appointment scheduling is always hard when I’m the only one that takes the children to any doctor, so I have to just work around the times they are with their father, the live class, and my work appointments. 

Is there anything you would like to share about your home school?

I never dreamed that I’d have to homeschool. I’m not a teacher type; instead, I’m an accountant. I never thought I’d have the patience or be able to hold it all together. I’m still afraid that I might not be able to hold it all together with all that is on my plate. But, I feel that this change was necessary and needed and that it was guided by God. When I was enrolling my kids online in this new school, I received a call from another friend who immediately recommended this school, even though she did not know I was in the process of enrolling both my kids there. So, I feel it was a God-send. I don’t know if they will stay with homeschooling next year or even with the same school, as there are so many options. However, what I do know is that God is with us in this journey, and He’s not going to leave us. Wherever he wants my children, I want them there too. So, we are open to His leading, and are so thankful that He’s brought us where we are presently. Lastly, Oregon had some bad icy weather for about a month last winter, and many schools were out six to nine days of school right after Christmas break. However, my kids did not miss any school, and I feel blessed that this was one of the silver linings of this transition. Praise the Lord!

Meet the Merry Moss Family

Please introduce yourself and your family to us, and also tell us what country and/or state you are from.

My name is Sarah Moss and I’m a single mom of two boys, ages 11 and 13. We live in Alberta, Canada. 

How long have you been home schooling?

I started homeschooling my eldest in kindergarten, and he’s in grade 7 now. My youngest attended two-thirds of a year at the local Adventist academy before I pulled him out to homeschool him as well.

Why did you decide to home school?

My sons have special needs, particularly my eldest. I intuitively did not feel he was ready or able to be sent to school at that young age. When he was born, I felt God speak to my heart that my son was given to me and it was my responsibility to raise him, not to send him to daycare or school. 

What style of home schooling does your family follow?

Our style of home schooling is passion driven, and we do a lot of unschooling as it suits the boys special needs.  

Do you have a philosophy about home schooling?

I think the closest I come to having a philosophy is that if I can tap into the children’s passions, they will independently learn everything they need to succeed in life.

What kinds of tools, resources, or curriculums do you use to home school, and why?

I use Saxon and Khan Academy for math, and Explode the Code for my youngest and Daily Grams for my oldest for language arts. Outside of that, we use very little specific curriculum; instead I make up our own lesson plan for the boys. It’s quite an eclectic style with pieces from many different places. We use a lot of video documentaries for science and social studies and field trips to round out the information. I’ve found that the more I can help them see the real life application, the more easily they learn the work.

Are you the primary “teacher,” or do your spouse or other family members participate with home schooling?

I am the primary teacher, with the exceptions being when I register them in specific classes, field trips, or co-ops.

What does a typical home schooling day look like in your home?

They work on their math and language arts beginning at 9 a.m., which can take about one and a half to two hours. Lately they have asked that they take turns doing their work to reduce the distraction of the sibling and we are trying that. So far, it seems to be helping each boy move more quickly through their work. In the afternoon we work on other subjects or go on field trips, and in the evening they each do independent reading out loud before bed.

What do you love the most about home schooling, and what do you dislike the most?

I think the familial relationships is the thing I love most. The boys have a friendship rarely seen between tween/teen siblings, and they also both have a close relationship with me. I love knowing who my children are and who is in their field of influence, and knowing that if they have a question about anything in life they will come and talk to me about it first. I love that we can specifically address areas they struggle in so they can learn despite any learning disorders. 

The thing I dislike most is the battle. Many days I wish I could take off the teacher hat and just be mom. It’s worth it, though. 

Is there anything you would like to share about your home school?

I tend to homeschool differently than most other people I know, but it works for my children and that’s all that matters. I think many times there are a lot of societal pressure, expectations, and misinformation around homeschooling. It’s pretty rare to be out with the boys during the day and have a positive response when we say they are homeschooled. People assume it takes enormous amounts of patience, or that you need a certain level of education to be an effective homeschooler. The reality is that parenting does take a LOT of patience; and, there are so many available resources to fit every person’s style of teaching and learning, which makes needing a certain level of education unnecessary. Having said that, not everyone should homeschool either. We need to choose the path that suits our families best and stick with it. What we are used to becomes normal.